Friday, January 11, 2013

"Uncle John's Band"

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"Uncle John's Band" - Grateful Dead


Lyrics:



Well the first days are the hardest days, don't you worry any more,
'Cause when life looks like Easy Street, there is danger at your door.
Think this through with me, let me know your mind,
Wo, oh, what I want to know, is are you kind?

 

It's a buck dancer's choice my friend; better take my advice.
You know all the rules by now and the fire from the ice.
Will you come with me? Won't you come with me?
Wo, oh, what I want to know, will you come with me?

 

Goddamn, well I declare, have you seen the like?
Their wall are built of cannonballs, their motto is "DON'T TREAD ON ME".
Come hear Uncle John'n Band playing to the tide,
Come with me, or go alone, he's come to take his children home.

 

It's the same story the crow told me; it's the only one he knows.
Like the morning sun you come and like the wind you go.
Ain't no time to hate, barely time to wait,
Wo, oh, what I want to know, where does the time go?

 

I live in a silver mine and I call it Beggar's Tomb;
I got me a violin and I beg you call the tune,
anybody's choice, I can hear your voice.
Wo, oh, what I want to know, how does the song go?

 

Come hear Uncle John's Band by the riverside,
Got some things to talk about, here beside the rising tide.

 

Come hear Uncle John's Band playing to the tide,
Come on along, or go alone, he's come to take his children home.
Wo, oh, what I want to know, how does the song go. 




...


What could "Uncle John's Band" possibly mean?  Where do its lyrics come from?

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_meaning_of_the_lyrics_to_the_Grateful_Dead_song_Uncle_John%27s_Band_written_by_Robert_Hunter#

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncle_John%27s_Band

     (Take special note of the "weasel words" section of the wikipedia article)




     It's a buck dancer's choice my friend; better take my advice.
     You know all the rules by now and the fire from the ice.




CTRL+click to listen in a new tab!
"Buck  Dancer's Choice" - New Lost City Ramblers (1963)


Q:  "What're you doing?"

A:  "I'm spooning!"



...


Robert Frost (1874–1963).  Miscellaneous Poems (1920).
2. Fire and Ice
(From Harper’s Magazine, December 1920.)

SOME say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,        5
I think I know enough of hate
To know that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.





...


Buckdancer’s Choice

By James L. Dickey

  
 
So I would hear out those lungs,   
The air split into nine levels,
Some gift of tongues of the whistler


In the invalid’s bed: my mother,   
Warbling all day to herself
The thousand variations of one song;


It is called Buckdancer’s Choice.   
For years, they have all been dying   
Out, the classic buck-and-wing men


Of traveling minstrel shows;   
With them also an old woman   
Was dying of breathless angina,


Yet still found breath enough   
To whistle up in my head   
A sight like a one-man band,


Freed black, with cymbals at heel,   
An ex-slave who thrivingly danced   
To the ring of his own clashing light


Through the thousand variations of one song   
All day to my mother’s prone music,   
The invalid’s warbler’s note,


While I crept close to the wall   
Sock-footed, to hear the sounds alter,   
Her tongue like a mockingbird’s break


Through stratum after stratum of a tone   
Proclaiming what choices there are   
For the last dancers of their kind,


For ill women and for all slaves
Of death, and children enchanted at walls   
With a brass-beating glow underfoot,


Not dancing but nearly risen   
Through barnlike, theatrelike houses   
On the wings of the buck and wing.

...

James Dickey, “Buckdancer’s Choice” from The Whole Motion: Collected Poems 1945-1992. Copyright © 1992 by James Dickey. Reprinted with the permission of Wesleyan University Press, www.wesleyan.edu/wespress.


Source: James Dickey: The Selected Poems (Wesleyan University Press, 1998) 


(full Buckdancer's Choice collection available here)

...

"How to Tap Dance the Buck and Wing"


...



Buckdancer's Choice (1965) is a collection of poems by James Dickey. It won the U.S. National Book Award for Poetry[1] Melville Cane Award in 1966.

The opening poem, "The Firebombing," relates a World War II pilot's memory of a night air raid on Beppu, Japan. The New York Times reviewer Joseph Bennett called it "one of the most important long poems written postwar."

In the poem "Buckdancer's Choice," the narrator listens as his mother, dying of emphysema in an adjacent room, whistles an old fiddle tune. The poem first appeared in The New Yorker for June 19, 1965, alongside "Hapworth 16, 1924", the last published story by J. D. Salinger.


...


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1246881/Why-did-J-D-Salinger-spend-60-years-hiding-shed-writing-love-notes-teenage-girls.html



and

[see post "Water Of Love"]



...



     Goddamn, well I declare, have you seen the like?
     Their wall are built of cannonballs, their motto is "DON'T TREAD ON ME".






Read this: 

 http://constitution.org/abus/le/miac-strategic-report.pdf

http://www.infowars.com/man-detained-for-displaying-don%E2%80%99t-tread-on-me-bumper-sticker/


Watch this:

"Glenn Beck and Penn Jillette talk about the MIAC report implicating libertarians as possible members of militias and domestic terrorists"

Ron Paul to Glenn Beck "You are getting brave here" On Gadsden "Snake" Flag
  
Glenn Beck - FEMA Camps - "They're making me say this.. help!!!" 


CTRL+click to watch clip in a new tab!

"Help me, Sharon!" from South Park S16E8: "Sarcastaball" 

(full episode available here)


...

For more information abour FEMA camps,



...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/greenslade/2011/jun/30/rupert-murdoch-newsinternational





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